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KDE Neon - A Nice Surprise!

In the world of Linux Desktop Environments I usually gravitate towards the more "Windows-like" ones like Xfce and LXDE, or something like MATE in Linux Mint. Strangely enough, I have never been a fan of KDE - probably one of the more Window-y DEs.
Not until I tried KDE Neon, that is. This is pretty flippin' nice, I have to say. The concept behind Neon is, as they say on the neon.kde.org website, is to give you "a stable Ubuntu long-term release as its core, packaging the hottest software fresh from the KDE Community ovens."

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Classic Mac OS In A Browser

You've come a long way, baby! Both Apple and PC products have evolved remarkably in a relatively short time. As a Baby Boomer, I have gone from having no concept of a personal computer, to carrying around a smartphone in my pocket that would surely seem akin to magic to a NASA engineer from the time of the Apollo missions.
Remember the original Mac OS - the black and white mouse-driven graphical interface that made consumers sit up and take notice? No? Well, you can now experience it running in a browser - another magical sounding concept. Now, the Internet Archive has some retro computing offerings from the other side of the great Mac/PC divide. Using a version of the PCE PC Emulator that has been ported to JavaScript, people interested in the Mac's early years can run System 6, System 7, and dozens of old apps, including MacWrite and Microsoft Basic using their browsers. Ars Technica

Three Strikes, And All That

I just watched a recent YouTube video from a professional wedding photographer who was very enthusiastic (actually he was raving) about the Mavic Pro quadcopter. The Mavic Pro is a roughly $1,000 device - a foldable drone -  and probably could be considered a "prosumer" product. The photographer was trying to test if it would work well enough to compliment his other drone equipment.
Fair enough - now here is the weird part. He had ordered the product from New Egg, a well known computer/electronics vendor who has a very good return policy - which turned out to be important. The first Mavic had a camera problem - one half of the footage was quite noticeably out of focus. He returned it for a prompt replacement.  
The second device also had a (different) camera problem, in that either the camera mount or the stabilization circuitry had an issue and he was experiencing quite a bad "jello" effect. "Jello" is the bane of drone videography, and usually manifest…

The Last Jedi Trailer - A Couple Of Questions

The Last Jedi teaser trailer was set free at the end of the 40th anniversary celebrations of the original Star Wars movie. The teaser lives up to it's name, and features most of the main characters and a few tantalizing glimpses and sound bites. As is the nature of these kinds of releases, sometimes more questions are raised than are answered - and a couple of biggies occurred to me.
Please understand, even though I am a Star Wars fan, I have not read any of the novels or seen any of the animated shows that may expand the universe created by the movies. I may be making a fool of myself here by questioning things that true "nerds" already know or suspect. 
That said, two big things leaped off the screen at me (as an aside, I loved the initial shot, which appears at first to be a star field, and then turns out to be glistening rocks).
First was the ancient books - you see a small number of very old books in a patch of sunlight. The first thing that came to my mind, believe…

VPN Use Is Up, Up, Up

Since the repeal of the Broadband Consumer Privacy Rules, VPN use and traffic is rather predictably spiking, according to many VPN providers. VPNs are not the b-all and end-all of privacy though, and indeed the usual cretins have stepped in to provide shady VPN services that may actually sell on user data.

Also remember:
ISPs still track your location data and DNS records, even if you're using a VPN. Similarly, a VPN doesn't stop a company from using on-device snoopware to track you (remember Carrier IQ?). Neither will it stop ISPs from charging you a premium for privacy (something both AT&T and Comcast have already experimented with). Nor will a VPN stop a company from using your credit score to provide worse customer service (something CableONE has crowed about). DSL Reports

Star Wars Episode IX Likely To Feature Some Carrie Fisher - Updated

Carrie Fisher's untimely passing late last year left not only a lot of shocked fans and friends, but a sizeable problem for the folks making the new Star Wars movies. While Ms. Fisher had already completed filming for her (reportedly more substantial) part in this year's Episode VIII, it's not known how much she might have been expected to appear in the follow-up Episode IX.
It's now being reported that Carrie Fisher/General Leia will not be "written out" or recast, and she will appear in some fashion in Episode IX. It is not expected to be via a CGI recreation, such as that seen in Rogue One - where a long-deceased Peter Cushingapparently returned to reprise his role as villainous Governor (later Grand Moff) Tarkin.
The logical inference would be of some brief scenes perhaps cobbled together from whatever footage is available from Ms. Fisher's previous work, somehow worked into the storyline of the yet-to-be-filmed movie. It would seem strange, I think, …

Color Video Camera With Effective ISO Rating of 5,000,000

Hey, how about a video camera that can shoot in the dark and actually produce quality color images - non of that grainy green or black & white stuff? There is such a beast, and it honestly looks incredible.
The X27 low light camera system produces very good color images in moonlight, starlight, and so on. The video below was reportedly shot at midnight at a beach.

This kind of thing has a great fascination for me, as my wife and I used to be quite "into" 35mm photography back in the day, when "pushing" black & white film to an effective ISO rating of 1600 or (gasp) 3200, was considered one step away from darkest alchemy. Now we have a video camera working at around 5,000,000 ISO.