How To Disable WiFi Protected Setup (WPS), And Why You Should

WPA2 with a strong password is secure as long as you disable WPS. You’ll find this advice in guides to securing your Wi-Fi all over the web. Wi-Fi Protected Setup was a nice idea, but using it is a mistake.

Your router probably supports WPS and it’s likely enabled by default. Like UPnP, this is an insecure feature that makes your wireless network more vulnerable to attack.

Most home users should be using WPA2-Personal, also known as WPA2-PSK. The “PSK” stands for “pre-shared key.” You set up a wireless passphrase on your router and then provide that same passphrase on each device you connect to your WI-Fi network. This essentially gives you a password that protects your Wi-FI network from unauthorized access. The router derives an encryption key from your passphrase, which it uses to encrypt your wireless network traffic to ensure people without the key can’t eavesdrop on it.

This can be a bit inconvenient, as you have to enter your passphrase on each new device you connect. Wi-FI Protected Setup (WPS), was created to solve this problem. When you connect to a router with WPS enabled, you’ll see a message saying you can use an easier way to connect rather than entering your Wi-FI passphrase.



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